April 21, 2024

Spinach companion plants (Inter-planting spinach)

Companion planting is a great way to improve the health and yield of your garden, but it can be hard to know which plants to pair with spinach, and it can be difficult to know which plants work well with spinach.

Spinach companion plants include lettuce, chard, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and tomatoes. These plants help keep pests away from your spinach while enriching the soil with nitrogen.

Spinach companion plants
Spinach companion plants

Let us dive in a little deeper into each companion plant and how they help spinach.

Why Use Companion Plants with Spinach

Companion planting is a great way to improve the health of your garden, and it can also help to improve the yield of your crops.

By using companion plants with spinach, you can help to improve the growth and health of your spinach plants. Some companion plants that are particularly good for spinach are lettuce, chard, and marigolds.

Some benefits to inter planting with spinach in bullet form are as follows:

1. Improved yield

Companion planting helps to improve the yield of your crops by providing them with more nutrients and better soil conditions.

2. Improved growth

Companion plants help to improve the growth of your crops by protecting them from pests and diseases, and by providing them with essential nutrients.

3. Increased resistance to pests and diseases

Companion plants can help to increase the resistance of your crops to pests and diseases, which can help to reduce the amount of damage that they suffer.

4. Increased nutrient uptake

Companion plants can help to improve the nutrient uptake of your crops, which can help them to grow more quickly and healthily.

5. Reduced need for fertilizers and pesticides

Companion planting can help to reduce the need for fertilizers and pesticides, which can save you money and be better for the environment.

6. Variety

Companion plants can add variety to your garden, which can make it more interesting to look at and also provide you with some useful crops.

7. Increased biodiversity

Companion planting can help to increase the biodiversity of your garden, which can provide you with more benefits in the long term.

8. Better soil structure

Companion plants can help to improve the structure of your soil, which can make it more fertile and easier to work with.

9. Improved water retention

Companion plants can help to improve the water retention of your soil, which can help to reduce the amount of water that is lost.

Inter-planting spinach
Inter-planting spinach

10. Reduced soil erosion

Companion plants can help to reduce the amount of soil erosion in your garden, which can keep your plants healthy and looking good.

As you can see, there are many benefits to using companion plants with spinach. By inter planting with spinach, you can improve the yield, growth, and health of your plants.

You can also save money by reducing the need for fertilizers and pesticides. So, if you are looking for a way to improve your garden, consider using companion plants with spinach.

When inter planting with spinach, it is important to be sure to use plants that have similar growing requirements. For example, if you are inter planting spinach with lettuce, be sure to use a lettuce variety that grows well in your climate and soil type.

You can also experiment with different companion plants to see which ones work best in your garden.

Spinach companion planting chart

Best Companion PlantReason
LettuceRepel harmful insects
ChardWithstand a little more sunlight
RadishesKeep the soil loose and cool around the spinach plants
MarigoldsRepel harmful insects and pests
CauliflowerKeep the spinach bed weed free and the spinach will help repel pests from the cauliflower plants
BroccoliComplement each other nutritionally
CabbageKeep spinach vines cooler in hot weather
Brussels sproutsHelp to shade and protect spinach from the hot summer sun
KaleLike spinach, kale can be planted in early spring or fall
BeetsHave similar growing requirements

Best spinach companions

There are a number of plants that make good companions for spinach. Some of the best include:

1. Lettuce

Lettuce is a good companion plant for spinach because it helps to repel harmful insects. Chard is also a good companion plant for spinach, as it attracts beneficial insects that can help to control pests. Finally, marigolds are a great companion plant for spinach because they help to suppress harmful fungi.

2. Chard

Just like spinach, chard is a leafy green vegetable that grows well when inter-planted with other plants. Chard is a little hardier than spinach and can withstand a little more sunlight. Chard also has a slightly different flavor than spinach, so it can add variety to your garden. Try planting chard next to tomatoes, carrots, or cucumbers.

3. Radishes

Radishes are another good inter-planting partner for spinach. For your information, radishes mature quickly, so they can be planted between rows of spinach. The radishes will be ready to harvest before the spinach gets too big, and they will help keep the soil loose and cool around the spinach plants.

4. Marigolds

Marigolds are one of the most popular companion plants for spinach. They help to repel harmful insects and pests, and also add a splash of color to your garden. Marigolds can be planted directly next to your spinach plants, or around the perimeter of your garden bed.

5. Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a cool weather crop and as such, grows well with spinach. The two vegetables can be planted together in the spring or fall garden. Cauliflower will help keep the spinach bed weed free and the spinach will help repel pests from the cauliflower plants. When inter-planting spinach and cauliflower, be sure to give each vegetable plenty of room to grow.

Spinach companion plants
Best spinach companions

6. Broccoli

Broccoli is one of the best vegetables to plant alongside spinach. Not only do these two greens complement each other nutritionally, but they also benefit from being planted close together. The main reason for this is that broccoli can help to deter pests that would otherwise target spinach plants. In addition, the two crops can share resources such as water and nutrients, which helps to optimize growth and yield. Overall, inter-planting broccoli and spinach is a great way to get the most out of your garden space.

7. Cabbage

Cabbage and spinach are both cool weather crops, so they make good companions in the garden, it will shade the ground and help keep spinach vines cooler in hot weather. Be sure to give each plant enough space to grow, as cabbage can get quite large.

8. Brussels sprouts

Brussels sprouts are a cool weather crop that is often planted in the spring and harvested in the fall. These little cabbages can be inter-planted with spinach, as they have similar growing requirements. The two plants will also benefit from each other, as Brussels sprouts can help to shade and protect spinach from the hot summer sun.

9. Kale

Kale is another leafy green vegetable that does well when inter-planted with spinach. Like spinach, kale can be planted in early spring or fall. Kale is a good source of vitamins A, C, and K, and it also contains calcium and iron. When choosing a kale variety to inter-plant with spinach, look for one that is tolerant of hot weather.

10. Beets

Beets are a good inter-planting partner for spinach, as they have similar growing requirements. Besides, beets can also help to keep the soil loose and cool around the spinach plants. When inter-planting beets and spinach, be sure to give each plant enough room

Spinach companion plants
What to plant with spinach

What not to plant with spinach

Try not to inter-plant spinach with the plants below:

1. Fennel

Fennel is a biennial or perennial herb that is often grown for its edible bulbs and leaves. When planted near spinach, the fennel can compete with the spinach for nutrients, light, and water. Fennel may also transfer harmful pests or diseases to the spinach plants.

2. Potatoes

Potatoes are not ideally planted with spinach because potatoes and spinach are both members of the Solanaceae family. This means that they share some pests and diseases. When these crops are planted together, the pests and diseases can easily spread from one plant to the other, resulting in damage to both crops.

3. Coriander

Coriander does not grow well with spinach because the two plants have opposite nutrient needs. While spinach prefers a nitrogen-rich soil, coriander prefers a soil that is high in phosphorus. When these plants are grown together, the competing nutrient needs can lead to smaller and weaker plants.

Spinach companion herbs

Some popular companions for spinach are parsley, dill, cilantro, and chives.

Inter-planting spinach with these herbs can help keep down pests and diseases, as well as improve the overall flavor of the spinach. Be sure to plant these herbs in close proximity to your spinach, as they will benefit from the same growing conditions.

Another great companion for spinach is garlic. Planting garlic near your spinach can help keep down pests and diseases, as well as add a delicious flavor to your greens. Again, be sure to plant these plants close together so that they can benefit from each other.

A final companion plant to mention is basil. Basil planted near spinach can help repel mosquitoes, and the two plants will also benefit from each other’s close proximity.

Tips for Planting and Growing Spinach in your Garden

When planting spinach, it’s important to consider its companion plants. Spinach grows well with carrots, chives, lettuce, and onions. These plants help to keep the soil healthy and provide shade for the spinach when it’s hot outside.

Additionally, inter-planting spinach with other vegetables helps to extend your harvest season.

Here are some tips for inter-planting spinach in your garden:

Tips for Planting and Growing Spinach
Tips for Planting and Growing Spinach

1. Sunny spot

Choose a sunny spot in your garden to plant your spinach. Spinach likes to growing in full sun, but it can also tolerate some shade.

2. Planting soil

Prepare the soil before planting by tilling it and adding compost. This will help the spinach to grow healthy and strong.

3. Companion plants

Plant carrots, chives, lettuce, and onions around your spinach plants. These plants will help to keep the soil healthy and provide shade for the spinach when it’s hot outside.

4. Water regularly

Water your spinach plants regularly to help them grow big and strong.

5. Harvest often

Harvest your spinach regularly to extend your harvest season.

6. Pest & Disease Control

Be sure to control pests and diseases. Spinach is susceptible to aphids, caterpillars, and slugs. Diseases that can affect spinach include downy mildew and powdery mildew.

7. Fertilize

Fertilize your spinach plants every few weeks to help them grow healthy and strong. It’s good to fertilize your spinach plants every few weeks with a balanced fertilizer. This will help them grow healthy and strong.

8. Mulch

Mulch your spinach plants to help keep the soil moist and cool. Mulching your spinach plants is a great way to keep the soil moist and cool. Mulch also helps to prevent weeds from growing.

There are several different types of mulch that you can use, including:

  • Bark chips
  • Straw
  • Grass clippings
  • Compost

Spinach is a versatile vegetable that can be inter-planted with other vegetables in your garden. By following these tips, you can grow healthy and delicious spinach plants that will provide you with a bountiful harvest.

Harvesting Spinach

Harvesting Spinach
Harvesting Spinach

To get the most out of your spinach crop, it is important to harvest it at the right time. Spinach is ready to harvest when the leaves are large enough to eat. If you wait too long, the leaves will become tough and bitter. (2)

The best time to harvest spinach is in the morning, after the dew has evaporated but before the sun gets too hot. Use a sharp knife or gardening shears to cut the leaves from the plant, being careful not to damage the stems.

You can either cut all of the leaves at once, or you can harvest them as you need them.

If you have inter-planted your spinach with other vegetables, be sure to harvest all of the spinach before you start harvesting the other vegetables.

Climate for spinach

Spinach is a cool-season vegetable that grows best in temperatures between 50 and 60 degrees F (1). It can be grown in most parts of the country, but it does best in areas with cooler summers. If you live in a warm climate, you can plant spinach in the spring or fall.

Final Thought

Companion planting with spinach can be a great way to improve the health and yield of your crop. By using plants that repel pests or attract beneficial insects, you can keep your spinach healthy and free from damage. If you’re looking for ways to improve your spinach harvest, try companion planting with some of these plants.